ANSI IESNA RP 7 01 PDF

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The American National Standard Practice for Office Lighting (ANSI/IESNA RP 04) . centconmosazy.ga Recommendations for safety lighting from the ANSI/IESNA RP-7 standard are: ANSI/IESNA RP Back. Standards PDF Cover Page Document preview ANSI/IES RP Illuminating Engineering Society of North America [IESNA]. Add to Alert; PDF; DRM. ANSI/IESNA RP,Recommended Practice for Lighting Industrial Facilities. • Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S) rules quoted are from the Alberta.


Ansi Iesna Rp 7 01 Pdf

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Ansi_iesna Rp-7 () - Download as PDF File .pdf) or read online. iesna. Previews IES RP 7 01 Pre. Uploaded by ANSI Roadway Lighting Standards. ANSI / IESNA RP CONTENTS. Forward. IESNA Lighting Design Guide. .. Dimming and Two-Level Switching Ballasts. ANSI/IES RP Recommended Practice for. Lighting Industrial Facilities. Publication of this Recommended Practice has been approved by the IES.

Uniform horizontal illu- minance where the maximum level is not more than one-sixth above the average level, and the minimum, not more than one-sixth below is frequently appropri- ate for specific industrial interiors where tasks are closely spaced and where there are similar tasks requiring the same amount of light.

In such instances, uniformity permits flexibility of functions and equip- ment locations. Neighboring areas with extreme lumi- nance differences are undesirable because continu- ously adapting between two significantly different luminance levels physically adjacent to each other can be visually fatiguing to the worker.

SS-405 Lighting for Industry Sept 2007 S-Guide

Uniformity may be more important in industrial lighting than in some other applications. While non-uniform lighting can add interest in applications that are of a more aesthetic 11 nature, industrial spaces can benefit from high-quality uniform lighting when the location of the task cannot always be accurately predicted.

Uniform lighting also allows repositioning of task locations or production machinery without needing to relocate luminaries. This can be particularly beneficial in high-bay industri- al facilities where the cost and inconvenience of mov- ing luminaries located 9 m 30 feet or more above the production floor can be substantial.

There are instances where non-uniform lighting is appropriate. Maintaining uniformity between adjacent areas, which have significantly different visibility and illuminance requirements, may be wasteful of energy - for example, a storage area adjacent to a machine shop.

In such instances, different lighting levels are required, according to the needs of the space. This may be accomplished by using similar luminaries with different lamp wattages or distributions, different num- bers of lamps per luminaire or by adjusting the num- ber of luminaries per unit area, making sure the other requirements of the lighting design are met.

In an industrial setting, vertical illuminance, and the illuminance at other planes between horizontal and vertical, is very important. In many large-parts assem- bly areas, work takes place on the underside of a major component, such as the wing or fuselage of an aircraft.

Work performed deep within the recesses of production equipment such as presses, breaks or molding machines requires that the light penetrate into the machine to the location of the task for effi- ciency and safety.

This may be accomplished by using wide-distribution general lighting equipment with a majority of the light output 40 to 70from the vertical. Light is reflected at high angles and high reflectance surfaces are provided in the work area.

The use of supplementary lighting also helps to put the light directly on the task. Diffuse light, including up-light components, from lumi- naries with very wide distribution such as low bay HID luminaries can have additional benefits in an industrial environment.

Additional information

The wide distribution can miti- gate the effects of lamp outages in a single luminaire and may allow production to continue in a normal man- ner without having to spot-replace lamps as they fail. Wide-distribution luminaries also tend to produce a higher level of vertical illuminance and wall luminance , at some sacrifice in horizontal illuminance.

This can be a definite advantage where the seeing task is in a plane other than horizontal and there is a need to increase the vertical component of the lighting for task visibility. Care must be exercised, however, to ensure that the wider light distribution does not produce discomfort or disability glare beyond workers tolerances. Industrial tasks come in all shapes and sizes.

Ansi_iesna Rp-7 (2001)

Flat tasks may be viewed in a horizontal plane or in planes at any number of other angles. The visual task asso- ciated with solid parts can be made more visible by a number of means including supplemental lighting and shadowing to emphasize the shape of the object.

Harsh shadows should be avoided, but some shadow effect may be desirable to accentuate the depth and form of objects. There are a few specific visual tasks where clearly defined shadows improve visibility, and such effects should be provided by supplementary lighting equipment arranged for the particular task. Refer to the material in Section Industrial lighting design requires a great deal of infor- mation about the tasks to be performed in the space.

Flicker Light flicker refers to quick, repeated changes in light intensity - light that appears to flutter and be unsteady. Although lights flicker on and off due to alternating current, the flicker rate is normally too fast for us to detect.

Flicker is a more common problem in lighting with ballasts, like fluorescent lights, particularly for those lights that are older and have magnetic ballasts. For this reason, upgrades to fluorescent light fixtures commonly include replacing magnetic ballasts with electric ballasts, which have less detectable flicker potential.

Electric ballasts are also less likely to produce a noticeable hum and are more energy efficient. Although the human eye cannot see fluorescent light flicker, some individuals can somehow detect the flicker.

This can result in complaints of headache, eye strain, and general eye discomfort.

Studies have linked lower reporting of eye strain symptoms and headaches with use of electronic ballasts in fluorescent lights and to increased use of natural lighting. Ensuring that light fixtures, particularly ballast, are functioning properly. Upgrading fluorescent lighting to electronic ballasts when replacements are needed.

In addition to decreasing the ability to see, glare can cause annoyance and discomfort. There are two types of glare — direct or reflected. A good test for direct glare is to stare off at an object in the distance, and cover up a light source between the source and the eye.

If the object can now be seen more easily, the light source is probably a source of glare.

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Indirect glare can be caused by light reflected off of polished, shiny or glossy surfaces, or from reflection off of glass surfaces windows, picture glass , or computer monitors. To detect reflected glare, look at a task for example, the desktop or computer monitor from a normal working position. Block the light from the source to the potential source of reflection.

If details are now more easily seen, reflected glare is a problem. Keeping lighting at recommended levels. Positioning light fixtures, work surfaces or computer monitors to reduce light that reflects into eyes.

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Positioning work area so that windows and fluorescent lights are parallel to line of sight.Personal visits to similar operations can be invaluable and are recommended whenever practical. Electric ballasts are also less likely to produce a noticeable hum and are more energy efficient. There are a few specific visual tasks where clearly defined shadows improve visibility, and such effects should be provided by supplementary lighting equipment arranged for the particular task.

The ability of the lamps to render colors accurately may have an effect on the recognition of colors or product components and safety colors used to protect the workers from dangerous conditions within the work place. The wide distribution can miti- gate the effects of lamp outages in a single luminaire and may allow production to continue in a normal man- ner without having to spot-replace lamps as they fail.

A good test for direct glare is to stare off at an object in the distance, and cover up a light source between the source and the eye.

Great attention is paid to the physical dimensions of the building, to the flow of the process and materials, and to production equipment. Considerations include working with local law enforcement and property owners. Because of this, the lighting designer should carefully discuss the manufacturing process with the facility personnel to obtain sufficient background information for proper evaluation of all of the design requirements. Uniform horizontal illu- minance where the maximum level is not more than one-sixth above the average level, and the minimum, not more than one-sixth below is frequently appropri- ate for specific industrial interiors where tasks are closely spaced and where there are similar tasks requiring the same amount of light.

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