A DIFFERENT MIRROR A HISTORY OF MULTICULTURAL AMERICA PDF

adminComment(0)
    Contents:

DIFFERENT MIRROR. A History. Of. Multicultural. America. LITTLE, BROWN AND COMPANY Strangers from a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans. Upon its first publication, A Different Mirror was hailed by critics and academics everywhere as a dramatic new retelling of our nation's past. Beginning with the. multicultural education, The rearview mirror reflected a white man in his forties. Entitled "The. Significance of the Frontier in American History,” his paper would.


A Different Mirror A History Of Multicultural America Pdf

Author:HARVEY CHEYNEY
Language:English, Japanese, Portuguese
Country:Sweden
Genre:Biography
Pages:513
Published (Last):14.10.2015
ISBN:335-6-65584-647-8
ePub File Size:28.33 MB
PDF File Size:18.83 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Registration needed]
Downloads:29293
Uploaded by: LOREAN

Author: Ronald Takaki Pages: Publication Date Release Date: ISBN: Product Group:Book Read ebook Ebook download A. This books (A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America [PDF]) Made by Ronald Takaki About Books Title: A Different Mirror(A History. From Different Shores: Perspectives on Race and. Ethnicity Strangers from a Different Shore: A History A different mirror: a history of multicultural America I.

Get FREE access by uploading your study materials

Berkhofer, Jr. In our examination of the nature of white racism, we have, in effect reproduced the very monocultural perspective we have been aiming to challenge. One way to avoid this trap is for history teachers to focus on the members of the excluded groups as first persons, as men and women with minds, wills, and voices.

In the telling of their stories, these individuals provide alternative perspectives to the past and help to re-vision history. Similarly, the story of westward expansion, for the Indians, was the history of how the West was lost.

Stories from multicultural America can also promote greater understanding. I think very few American people really know anything about Chinese. They also introduce firsthand knowledge. After she escaped from slavery, Harriet Jacobs wrote, "[My purpose] is not to tell you what I have heard but what I have seen—and what I have suffered.

The "varied carols" of Americans, to use Walt Whitman's poetic description of our stories, invite all of us to become listeners. The stories also take us beyond what critics of multiculturalism such as Schlesinger castigate as "victim studies.

They share their fierce visions of the new land. Spreading from shtetl to shtetl across Russia, a song pointed the way for Jewish immigrants: As the Russians, mercilessly There is a land, America, Where everyone lives free. Coming from a different shore, a Japanese immigrant wrote: Day of spacious dreams! I sailed for America, Overblown with hope. But do the stories of our many groups represent disparate narratives? One pursuit of our multicultural past has been to study the history of a specific group, focusing on its separate memory.

Rodriguez's Puerto Ricans: Born in the U. This approach is also found in courses that focus narrowly on individual groups such as African Americans or Asian Americans. One problem of such teaching is a tendency to fragmentize the study of society and thus deny opportunities for different groups to learn about one another. Seeking to avoid this pitfall, we sometimes turn to the "add-on" approach.

This soft option allows us to maintain the traditional focus of a course while adding a week on African Americans and another on Hispanics. Meanwhile, however, intergroup relationships remain invisible, and the big picture is missing.

Do our various stories, when studied together, connect the diverse memories and communities to a larger national narrative? In exploring this question, some historians have chosen a pluralistic rather than a particularistic perspective. A multicultural mirror of our past can enable us as history teachers to help students study differences among groups: African Americans were enslaved, Indian tribes like the Cherokees and Choctaws were forced by the federal government to migrate west of the Mississippi River, and Mexicans were incorporated by war.

Though they were targets of nativist prejudices, Irish and Jewish immigrants were at least allowed to become citizens.

But Asian immigrants were excluded from citizenship: the Naturalization Law of reserved citizenship to "white" persons. This act remained in effect until A broad comparative approach can also enable students to connect our diversity to the major developments and events in American history such as westward expansion, the industrial revolution, urbanization, immigration, the American Revolution, the Civil War, and World War II.

A Different Mirror Quotes

From this vantage point, students can see how the experiences of our many ethnic communities occurred within shared contexts. During the nineteenth century, for example, Irish immigrants worked in New England factories manufacturing textiles from cotton cultivated by enslaved blacks on lands taken from Indians and Mexicans. In northern cities, blacks and Irish competed for jobs as dockworkers and domestic servants.

Like blacks, the Irish were stereotyped as "savages," ruled by passions rather than the "civilized" virtues of self-control and hard work. The workplace was frequently the site where different ethnic groups were pitted against one another.

In , Mississippi planters recruited Chinese immigrants to discipline newly freed blacks. During that same year, Chinese immigrant laborers were transported from California to Massachusetts to break an Irish immigrant strike. I'm making my kids read it over the summer. site Edition Verified download.

This book is an excellent source of information for people who want to round out their understanding of USA history with untold stories from the perspective of those who are seldom heard. Is it biased as other reviewers claim? Yes absolutely, but so is every other book written on American history since we and all these writers are humans and therefore inherently biased. This work essentially gives a third side to what is often presented as an equally biased two dimensional story with the Christian Anglo-European settlers as the completely untarnished heroes taking on savage natives and the paternalistic burden of caring for those so-called less civilized child-like people who are made to serve them.

This book does not, in my opinion, take away from the bravery of these settlers and those among them who pushed west. It does provide, however, another important angle of insight into the human beings behind the caricatures. The only thing that I can think of that would have made this book even better is a more rounded presentation of all people characterized as the victims They too certainly have more than one side.

Overall, I believe the greatest value this book offers is a better understanding of the origins of certain unconscious biases held by all of us about race, religion, ethnicity and a host of other topics that still persist in our culture today. The book is written simply and to make an impact. Society, culture, ethnicity, and prejudice are all complicated subjects and Takaki weaves them together to explain our differences and provide some common ground. The book is mostly chronological, with particular topics events or groups of people separated into their own chapters or sections, so every once in awhile there is a bit of a time shift.

I think for most readers Takaki reaches his goal of spreading a little of understanding, patience, and acceptance. America is a tough place, no matter your background, but it is far tougher for some. While some of us may have knowledge about Ellis Island from our ancestors, the stories of non-European immigrants has largely been left out of the picture.

Takaki shows connections between historical events and the ethnic groups that were involved but not mentioned in standard accounts. See all reviews. site Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about site Giveaway. This item: A History of Multicultural America. Set up a giveaway. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. A Different Mirror for Young People: Rebecca Stefoff.

Pages with related products. See and discover other items: There's a problem loading this menu right now. Learn more about site Prime.

Get fast, free shipping with site Prime. Back to top. Get to Know Us. site Payment Products. English Choose a language for shopping. site Music Stream millions of songs. site Advertising Find, attract, and engage customers. site Drive Cloud storage from site. Alexa Actionable Analytics for the Web. siteGlobal Ship Orders Internationally.

site Inspire Digital Educational Resources. site Rapids Fun stories for kids on the go. site Restaurants Food delivery from local restaurants. ComiXology Thousands of Digital Comics. DPReview Digital Photography. Questions like the one that my taxi driver asked me are always jarring.

According to this powerful and popular but inaccurate story, our country was settled by Euro- pean immigrants, and Americans are white.

In , two years after the Census Bureau announced that Americans had settled the entire continent and that the frontier had come to an end, Turner gave a presentation at the meeting of the American Historical Association.

It takes him from the rail- road car and puts him in a birch canoe.

It strips off the garments of civilization, and arrays him in the hunting shirt and mocca- sin. It puts him in the log cabin of the Cherokee and Iroquois. In his introduction Handlin. Demography is declaring: Not all of us came origi- nally from Europe!

Currently, one-third of the American people do not trace their ancestries to Europe; in California, minorities have become the majority. Indeed, we will all be minorities. How can We prepare ourselves for this future when the Master Narrative is such a-pliiverful force in our thinking about the past? In , the Task Force on Minorities for New York stressed the importance of a culturally diverse educa- tion.

Asked why multiculturalism is so important, Dean Fred Lukermann answered: As a national university, Minnesota has to offer a national curriculum—one that includes all of the peoples of America.

He added that after graduation many students move to cities like Chicago and Los Angeles and thus need to know about racial diversity.

A Different Mirror Pdf

Moreover, many educators stress, multiculturalism has an intellectual pur- pose: a more inclusive curriculum is also a more accurate one. Missing is the bigger picture. In our approach, we will instead study race and ethnicity inclu- sively and comparatively. The planters preferred workers from their homeland, for they wanted their new society to be racially homo- geneous.

This thinking abruptly changed, however, in , when the elite encountered an uprising of discontented and armed work- ers. After quelling the insurrection with reinforcements of British troops, the planters turned to Africa for their primary labor sup— ply; the new workers would be enslaved and prohibited from own- ing arms.

Subsequently, the African population spiked upward and slavery spread across the South.The Chinese were being pressured by the spreading British Empire on their East to cross the seas and join and collide with the same culture in our West The Japanese are followed from their arrival in fruitless pursuit of gold hills of it they had heard through World War Two where while young male Japanese Americans were grudgingly allowed to fight on the European front, their families were interned in what can only be called prison camps to prevent any possible seditious activity.

Elementary school teachers have often taught ethnic diversity through the foods and holidays of foreign countries. I am proud to be in a [military] suit like this now. Don't have a site?

Fredrickson of Stanford University and Robert K. This new edition of A Different Mirror is a remarkable achievement that grapples with the raw truth of American history and examines the ultimate question of what it means to be an American. We have confused the study of America's ethnic groups with foreign area studies. Embeds 0 No embeds.

CAITLYN from Montgomery
Look over my other posts. I enjoy freshwater aquariums. I am fond of reading novels needily .
>